Salinomycin


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Uses of Salinomycin

Salinomycin is currently approved by the FDA in the United States and is used around the world. It is used as a supplement in poultry feed, and in particular for broiler chickens. It is a bestselling feed additive for chickens and contributes to producing millions of tons of disease free chicken meat throughout the world.

Salinomycin is currently used primarily to control coccidiosis in the broiler chickens. Coccidiosis is an intestinal disease that can spread from one animal to another, especially those living in close contact. Chickens become droopy in appearance and begin to huddle together. They often look dirty and don't eat or drink much. After a few days there is noticeable blood in their droppings. Salinomycin acts against three different stages of this parasite's lifecycle.

Not only has the use of salinomycin been used to control coccidiosis, but the use of this drug has led to a decrease in necrotic enteritis in chickens. Necrotic enteritis is caused by clostridium perfringens and is a disease in poultry that causes immobility, dark diarrhea, changes in feathers and eyes, and sometimes sudden death in otherwise healthy chickens. This disease can spread quickly through flocks and cause significant damage. Humans can get food poisoning from the diseased meat that is not cooked to a high enough temperature.

It has been reported that using Salinomycin may also reduce salmonella in chickens. Finally, salinomycin is also used in a variety of animals to improve nutrient absorption.

In spite of the many benefits of using salinomycin to prevent various ailments in chickens there is the risk of overdose. The drug produces severe toxicity when it is accidentally ingested by animals in higher than recommended doses. This happened in the Netherlands in 1996 when cat food was contaminated with salinomycin. Some of the cats experienced partial paralysis, especially in the hind limbs. In some cases there was even respiratory failure and death.

Salinomycin poisoning in turkeys has been reported on several occasions. In one particular incident a flock of turkey hens were accidentally fed a mix containing salinomycin sodium. The result was that almost 35 percent of the flock died. Even though the antibiotic is used for broiler chickens, it is not recommended for laying chickens or chickens that are breeding.

 

 

 

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